When touch is not common practice: The haptonomic approach and therapy for higher-functioning children and adults diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Frans van Nieuwmegen, ‘When touch is not common practice:
The haptonomic approach and therapy for higher-functioning
children and adults diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)’, http://www.ijhh.org/userfiles/1545747528.pdf, International Journal of Haptonomy and Haptotherapy (12/25/18) 

Latent capacity to feel

The haptonomic approach offers an opening and room for development in mutually meaningful contact, thus providing an important contribution to the individual possibilities for personal development for high-functioning people with ASD. (…) Haptonomy and haptotherapy offer insight into the fundamental and essential role that developing the capacity for feeling plays in the practice, understanding and extension of mutual emotional contact. The development of this affective, physical capacity for contact, for touch, is formative to the individual. It fosters and affirms the person in the sense of developing self-worth, individuality, an internal sense of security, self-confidence, a sense of purpose and a zest for life.(…) When working with high-functioning persons with ASD, haptonomy approaches and invites people to develop their latent capacity to feel and to be in contact. This creates new possibilities for these persons.